Virginia Roads - I-264


You can have it in any color you want, as long as it's not cut out.


EB through the Downtown Tunnel, a critical link between Portsmouth and Norfolk under the Elizabeth River. It's down deep enough that it's still in a cut section through the I-464 interchange. That's the steepest curve I've ever seen in a tunnel, halfway through.


As I-264 EB continues to rise toward the Berkley Bridge, the interchange ramps stay below. The EB-SB ramp would have to be in a long tunnel to be direct, so instead it leaves late and curls 270 degrees to the left to meet the WB-SB ramp. In the last photo, the ramp from I-464 NB to I-264 WB is doing a similar loop on the left.


In the midst of traffic heading WB into the tunnel, I had the time to photograph some narrow shields and a large expanse of pavement in the median. This turns out to have been the original area of the toll plaza, back when the south tube was the only crossing here. As much traffic as there is now, it's hard to imagine taking away half of its throughput.


Once I get to the mouth of the tunnel, things start moving again, so enjoy the ride by clicking. Notice that I get radio reception all the way through the tunnel, which is unusual even for one this short.


Older WB signs courtesy Lou Corsaro, over the wide C-D road that stretches from Exit 15 (Newtown Rd./VA 403) through I-64 (Exit 14) and past here at lucky US 13/Exit 13.


The advance sign for the C-D road exit, which should say "Exits 15-14-13" in a long plaque at the top. There's a loop ramp to I-64 Inner/clockwise from the C-D road, but a direct left ramp from I-264 is intended for mainline traffic to separate the flow from the crowded C-D road.


Atlantic St. NB in the beach area of Virginia Beach, a block before I-264 begins.

Exit 8 to I-464
Exit 13 to US 13
Onto I-64
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